Lions scored a big value steal in trade up with Vikings

Now that the shock of the unexpected trade is over, the rational analysis of the Detroit Lions bundling three draft picks and shipping them to the Minnesota Vikings for the ability to acquire WR Jameson Williams gets to happen. From a draft value standpoint, the Lions are guilty of some larceny for what they did to their NFC North rival.

The Lions traded picks 32, 34 and 66 to the Vikings. In return, the Vikings sent Detroit No. 12 and No. 46 overall. Using the Rich Hill-inspired draft trade value chart, the deal strongly favors Detroit.

The values for the picks involved reflect the value the Lions acquired.

Minnesota’s picks:

No. 12 – 347

No. 46 – 128

Detroit’s picks:

No. 32 – 184

No. 34 – 175

No. 66 – 76

The Lions acquired 475 points in value and gave back just 435 in this chart, which is modified yearly to adapt to the changing value of contracts. Using the more familiar “Jimmy Johnson” chart, it’s an even bigger steal for the Lions.

In that value chart, created by Cowboys coach Jimmy Johnson over 30 years ago and the generally accepted standard, the Vikings gave up 1,640 points and received just 1,410 in return from Detroit.

The values don’t mean much if the players acquired with the picks don’t perform as expected, of course. But from a straight value standpoint, Brad Holmes beat his new Vikings counterpart, Kwesi Adofo-Mensah, in the trade.